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Film ID  ACE007
Article  The
Title  Reclining Figure. Henry’s Moore’s sculpture for the UNESCO building in Paris
Series 
Part 
Date  1959
Director  Dudley Shaw Ashton
Production Company 
Synopsis  A study of making of the Reclining Figure (1958) by British abstract sculptor, Henry Moore (1898-1986), commissioned for the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, from its original conception through to the completed work.
Minutes  14 min
Choreographer 
Full synopsis  ACE007.2 (00:00:00 - 00:13:53)
Credits. Henry Moore’s Reclining Figure (1958). Commentary reads Moore’s words over: “The human form is what interests me most, but I learned the principles of shape and rhythm from shape and rhythm from observing natural objects, such as stones, rocks, bones, trees and plants.” Pebbles and rocks “show Nature’s way of working with stone”; “there is in Nature a limitless variety of shapes and rhythm from which the sculptor can enlarge his form-knowledge experience.” Moore carving small figurine. Family group in plaster. Superimposed on Unesco building. Other models. Unesco. Plaster maquettes. Moore with maquette. Moore looking at blocks of travertine stone. Mountains, the source of Carrara marble. Marble quarries. Half-size plaster model of the Reclining Figure. Moore working on sculpture. Marble being shaped at the quarry. Moore working on sculpture. Statue near the Eiffel Tower. Moore looking at the statue. Details. Commentary compares Moore’s work to that of Turner. Commentary suggests that the Reclining Figure stands for both Man and Nature. It also “stands for a great idea”, that of the unity of purpose for which Unesco stands, “the grandeur to which the ideas of Humanity can reach”. THE END.

Full credits  Produced by The British Council and the Arts Council of Great Britain. Commentary written and spoken by Philip Hendy; Photography by Bill Smeaton-Russell; Edited by Mary Beales; Directed by Dudley Shaw Ashton.
Watch segments  ACE007.2 (00:00:00 - 00:13:53)
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